Tag Archives: carbon dioxide

New study aims to calculate role of terrestrial carbon in emissions from rivers and streams

Credit: public domain CC0 The interplay between the terrestrial carbon cycle and carbon dioxide emissions from streams and rivers into the atmosphere is the focus of a new study led by the Yale School of the Environment to calculate the amount of the global budget for carbon emissions. The study …

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Celebrate Women Atmospheric Scientists on International Women’s Day

Now people celebrate the entire month of March as Women’s History Month, in addition to International Women’s Day on March 8. Of course, a day or a month is really not enough to share all the accomplishments and accomplishments of women today, let alone those who have blazed the trails …

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Microbes and nutrient cycling

A nutrient cycle refers to the exchange of organic and inorganic matter in an ecosystem, resulting in the sequestration, elimination, recycling, and generation of particular substances and elements in the environment. Microbial life has long been known to play a vital role in consuming and regenerating resources in the environment …

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Is there good news about climate change? This scientist has it.

The world’s leading authority on climate breakdown issued its most serious warning yet to world leaders last week. UN Secretary-General António Guterres calls the report of the International Panel on Climate Change “an atlas of human suffering and a damning indictment of failing climate leadership”, as people around the world …

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Ruminations on science in Katharine Hayhoe’s book Saving Us

By David R. LegatesCP Guest Contributor | Sunday, February 27, 2022 Photo: Unsplash/Dikaseva In Save Us: A Climate Scientist’s Case for Hope and Healing in a Divided World (One Signal Publishers, 2021) Professor Katherine Hayhoe, climate scientist and Christian, categorizes people according to their beliefs about global warming: the alarmed, …

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A geoscience expert to study why continents split where magma is lacking

D. Sarah Stamps. Credit: Mike Lee The Earth’s surface keeps moving and changing shape, disintegrating and forming new land masses and oceans. In the billions of years of planet Earth’s history, there have been 10 supercontinents, the most famous and recent being Pangea which shattered around 175 million years ago. …

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Carbon capture can be part of the climate solution

Imagine a group of campers carelessly polluting the forest, leaving beer cans, plastic wrap, and propane tanks strewn about the understory. An ecologist arrives at their campsite and explains how they are harming the forest ecosystem. Campers decide to stop polluting, but never clean up the mess. This is analogous …

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Land conservation is essential to protect the planet

Land conservation is extremely important for the well-being of the Earth and all species that inhabit it, including humanity. The entire biosphere, or all life on earth, depends on the connections and functions of the world’s ecosystems. As the health of ecosystems declines, the health of communities, states, nations, and …

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End of the world: MIT scientist says we are on the verge of mass extinction | Sciences | New

At least five mass extinctions have occurred in the past, caused by cosmic and natural phenomena. Scientists estimate that up to 99.9% of all life, plant and animal, has been wiped out. The most recent extinction, the so-called Cretaceous-Tertiary Extinction, occurred around 66 million years ago when a killer asteroid …

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The science everyone needs to know about climate change

By Betsy Weatherhead I am an atmospheric scientist who has worked on global climate science and assessments for most of my career. Here are some things you should know. What drives climate change The main focus of the negotiations is carbon dioxide, a greenhouse gas that is released when fossil …

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Strange ‘eggshell’ exoplanets could have ultra-smooth surfaces

Weird, newly theorized “eggshell planets” may possess ultra-thin outer layers with ultra-smooth surfaces unlike those seen in any world to date, a new study reports. Astronomers may have already detected at least three eggshell planets, the scientists noted. In the past 25 years or so, astronomers have confirmed the existence …

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Jacobs Engineering: Understanding the Main Findings of the IPCC Sixth Assessment Report

The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) has started publishing its Sixth Assessment Report (AR6)on the drivers and potential impacts of climate change and the ways in which human societies may respond. The report highlights the scale of the challenge we face in reducing greenhouse gas emissions and mitigating the …

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The Gabonese experience on the future of climate finance

Today, at a time when climate change has become unmistakably apparent, more businesses and governments are committing to become carbon neutral, net zero and carbon positive. The African Conservation Development Group (ACDG) is one of the companies working to preserve and market the Gabonese rainforest. With their current 50-year logging …

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Reveal hidden alien oceans, with chemistry

Sub-Neptunes are planets smaller than Neptune but larger than Earth. They are generally between 1.7 and 3.5 times the diameter of the Earth. A new study from NASA says astronomers can detect the oceans on some of these worlds by analyzing the chemistry of their atmospheres. Image via NASA / …

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Climate change will kill national sovereignty as we know it

REUTERS As WE collectively rush into the era of climate change, international relations as we have known them for almost four centuries will change beyond recognition. This change is probably inevitable, and maybe even necessary. But it will also cause new conflicts, and therefore wars and suffering. Since the Peace …

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Ancient Groundwater – Our Time Press

Why the water you drink can be thousands of years old As surface water recedes in the western United States, people are drilling deeper wells and tapping into older groundwater that can take thousands of years to replenish naturally. Marissa gruneAlain seltzerKevin M. BefusSome of North America’s groundwater is so …

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A visual and scientific history of water from

image: Water cover seen Following Credit: MIT PRESS Water is so pervasive in our lives that it’s easy to take it for granted. The average American uses ninety gallons of water a day; almost all the liquids we come across are primarily water – milk, for example, contains 87 percent …

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Cosco Shipping Lines Adds Next Generation EverFRESH Active Controlled Atmosphere Systems

SINGAPORE – Cosco Shipping Lines recently upgraded its refrigerated freight fleet with next-generation EverFRESH® Carrier Transicold active controlled atmosphere (AC) systems. High performance systems allow perishable shipments to travel further, while maintaining product quality. Carrier Transicold is part of Carrier Global Corporation (NYSE: CARR), the world’s leading provider of healthy, …

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The slow carbon cycle, sink and waste | Clubs And Organizations

Dive into the slow carbon cycle! Fluxes include: respiration and photosynthesis (between the biosphere, hydrosphere and atmosphere), sedimentation and metamorphosis (between the biosphere and lithosphere), weathering, erosion, volcanism and combustion of fossil fuels (between the lithosphere and the atmosphere), dissolution and degassing (between the hydrosphere and the atmosphere), and precipitation, …

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[OPINION] The relatively unsung hero of the battle against climate change

We are fighting a battle against climate change, and its outcome will decide whether or not we will be in more danger. The battle ensued tons of carbon dioxide (CO2) humanity released into the atmosphere since the industrial revolution. Since 1880, data from NASA shows that human-induced climate change has …

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Development or survival? Imbalance – Ground views

Photo courtesy of the BBC Sri Lanka’s country declaration to the 21st Conference of the Parties (known as COP21) to the 1992 United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change, held in Paris in 2015, said: “We are aware of the big difference in carbon dioxide emitted by biological sources. and …

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Even Noah would be amazed

A feature-length BBC News television report from July 16, 2021, titled “Catastrophic flooding across Western Europe as politicians blame climate change”, showed the devastation caused by the massive and rapid flooding in the region. Western Europe at the confluence of the borders of Germany, Belgium, France and Luxembourg during the …

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It turns out that Venus (almost) has tectonic plates

Beneath Venus’s acidic clouds and crushing atmospheric pressure lies a rocky surface strewn with geological mysteries. Sometimes referred to as Earth’s “sister planet” because it is similar in size with a similar iron core, molten mantle, and rocky crust, there is evidence that Venus was once a aquatic world like …

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EarthSky | Are Earth-like Biospheres Rare?

Artist’s concept of Kepler-442b (left) in contrast to Earth. This potentially habitable rocky exoplanet is about double the mass of Earth. It is the only world found to date that might be able to maintain a life-like surface, atmosphere, and hydrosphere similar to those on Earth. Image via Ph03nix1986 / …

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The mystery of methane on Mars? Depends on time of day

Artist’s concept of ESA’s Trace Gas Orbiter, as part of the ExoMars mission. This instrument analyzes the Martian atmosphere and still has not found methane in the atmosphere of Mars. This is despite the fact that NASA’s Curiosity rover has detected methane in Martian air on several occasions. Now scientists …

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Despite the pandemic, atmospheric carbon levels hit a new peak

WASHINGTON (AFP) – An atmospheric research station in Hawaii has recorded its highest concentrations of carbon dioxide since precise measurements began 63 years ago, a government agency said on Monday, adding that the coronavirus pandemic was due to hardly had an impact on the increasing levels of greenhouse gases. The …

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Is carbon the “culture” of the future?

Growing awareness and concern for the environment, changes in government policy, America’s return to the Paris Agreement and high demand for carbon offsets all indicate an appetite for another type of agricultural crop – carbon. “There has been growing discussion of how to create a way for farmers to earn …

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Conscious Mode – OrissaPOST

Iit’s not just what you eat that kills the earth and all of its inhabitants. This is also what you wear. Every time you buy an item of clothing, you are making a choice between the biosphere and the lithosphere. The biosphere is an agricultural area where cotton, flax (from …

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Is carbon farming the “culture” of the future?

Growing awareness and concern for the environment, changes in government policy, America’s return to the Paris Agreement and high demand for carbon offsets all indicate an appetite for a different type of agricultural crop – carbon. There is growing interest in the possibilities of carbon farming. (Photo Texas A&M AgriLife) …

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Using CO2 to create a limestone rock substitute

Image Credit: Parmna / Shutterstock.com A California-based cleantech pioneer – Blue Planet Ltd. – learns from nature to make concrete more sustainable by capturing biomimetic carbon. The company’s economically sustainable carbon capture process creates a limestone rock substitute that can replace aggregate for concrete, dramatically reducing the material’s ultimate environmental …

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US dairies’ methane emissions down

Dairy and livestock trends in the United States indicate a decline in methane emissions. While greenhouse gas has been used by climate change activists to crush animal agriculture, science points to a different trend. Methane as a greenhouse gas has long been the Achilles heel of campaigners to tackle animal …

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The road to greener hydrogen

Whether hydrogen fuel holds the key to delivering widespread renewable energy remains a heated debate. What cannot be argued is the shear investment that donors are investing in the power source – up to € 470 billion by 2050. When skeptics protest the potential of hydrogen, as an efficient and …

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Looking to the future: carbon capture and storage

One industry that will be worth around $ 1.4 trillion by 2050, and which to date has reached the significant investment figure of $ 300 million, is the carbon capture and storage (CCS) industry. This was mentioned in the report created by Vivid Economics titled Stimulus greenness index in 2020. …

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Planet Earth – WorldAtlas

The Earth is a celestial object and one of the components of the solar system. It is the third planet from the Sun, and the only celestial object capable of supporting life. Earth is the 6th largest object in the solar system, with an average radius of 6,371 kilometers, and …

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Carbon cycle – WorldAtlas

Carbon is one of the many natural elements that can be found on and in the Earth. It is one of the most abundant elements after hydrogen, helium and oxygen, and is an integral part of all human, animal and plant life. Carbon is particularly important in biology because it …

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The four spheres of the earth

The earth can be divided into one of the four main subsystems, namely: earth, water, air and all living things. These categories are called spheres and are the lithosphere, hydrosphere, atmosphere and biosphere, respectively. The first three of these spheres are abiotic, meaning that they are not living things, while …

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Mark Torres wins the Clarke Prize from the Geochemical Society

PICTURE: Mark Torres with water samples taken from the Icelandic river Efri Haukadalsá in 2016. see After Credit: Photo by Woodward Fisher HOUSTON – (February 12, 2021) – Rice University’s Mark Torres has won the Geochemical Society’s highest honor for early career scientists, the FW Clarke Award, becoming the fourth …

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The UN confirms the ocean is fucked up

The ocean is not doing well. The seas, which contain approximately 332,519,000 cubic miles of water, heat, rise, acidify and lose oxygen. And a new comprehensive UN climate special report, released Wednesday, presents an encyclopedic review of how the Earth’s oceans and ice caps have been altered as the world …

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