Tag Archives: billion years

Microbes and nutrient cycling

A nutrient cycle refers to the exchange of organic and inorganic matter in an ecosystem, resulting in the sequestration, elimination, recycling, and generation of particular substances and elements in the environment. Microbial life has long been known to play a vital role in consuming and regenerating resources in the environment …

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Plate tectonics could be the source of all life on Earth (and on alien planets too)

Plate tectonic activity has been blamed for major earthquakes and tsunamis since the idea, first put forward in 1912 by meteorologist Alfred Wegener, has existed. Subduction forces obliterated entire continents during the 3.2 billion years that plate tectonics occurred on our 4.5 billion year old Earth. The planet’s crust is …

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It used to be their world, now it’s yours – Red Bluff Daily News

Here’s something readers probably won’t find in another Red Bluff Daily News column: Andrew Knoll is best known for his contributions to Precambrian paleontology and biogeochemistry. He discovered microfossil records of early life around the world and was among the first to apply the principles of taphonomy and paleoecology to …

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Study reveals more hostile conditions on Earth as life evolves

Graph showing how UV radiation on Earth has changed over the past 2.4 billion years. Credit: Please credit: Gregory Cooke / Royal Society Open Science For long parts of the past 2.4 billion years, Earth may have been more inhospitable to life than scientists previously thought, according to new computer …

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Caterpillar and butterfly – The Ukiah Daily Journal

A caterpillar is a eating machine, focused exclusively on consumption, much like a capitalist enterprise. But unlike a business, a caterpillar is a living organism, part of a larger process. At some point, it stops consuming, forms a protective chrysalis and completely dissolves, giving way to the emergence of a …

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How LUCA, the first living being on Earth, appeared out of nowhere

December 4, 2021 Pedro necklace Update: 12/04/2021 01:25 a.m. Keep The study of the origin of life is a fascinating and complex field and has disturbed scientists not only out of intellectual curiosity, but also as a way forward to understand our own origins. One of the first to address …

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What is geomicrobiology?

Geomicrobiology is the study of the role of microbes in the geological and geochemical processes that shaped the earth and continue to function today. Microbes play a vital role in the recycling, generation, sequestration and elimination of a wide variety of substances and chemicals in the environment Going through biogeochemical …

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Hydrate or Die: Has Venus Ever Been Inhabitable?

Title: Has Venus ever been habitable? Constraints of an interior-atmosphere-redox couple Evolution model Authors: Joshua Krissansen-Totton, Jonathan J. Fortney, Francis Nimmo Institution of the first author: University of California, Santa Cruz Status: Published in the Planetary Science Journal [open access] Where did the water go? (And was that there to …

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A visual and scientific history of water from

image: Water cover seen Following Credit: MIT PRESS Water is so pervasive in our lives that it’s easy to take it for granted. The average American uses ninety gallons of water a day; almost all the liquids we come across are primarily water – milk, for example, contains 87 percent …

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March? This is old news. Welcome to the decade of Venus

When it comes to exploring the solar system, the last few decades have undeniably been focused on visiting Mars. From sending rovers to its surface to making plans for possible crewed missions, the Red Planet holds an important place in our understanding of planetary science. But what about our other …

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Us and our house | Cyprus Mail

Earth is the only planet we know where we can live By Roberto Sciffo The blue planet, planet Earth, is unique to our solar system and, given our current state of technological advancement, it is the only planet we know of where we can live. The “big picture effect” is …

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New evidence of geologically recent Venusian volcanism

Magellan SAR image of Aramaiti Corona. Narina Tholus (center left) appears as two adjacent domes superimposed on the outer west fracture ring. Credit: Institute of Planetary Sciences New data analysis techniques are finding evidence of recent volcanism in old data from Magellanic spacecraft. It is not known if this activity …

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Ugly diamonds hold more than a billion years of Earth’s history

Cloudy and yellowish “fibrous diamonds” are too unsightly for most jewelers. But for scientists, their crystal structure holds precious secrets dating back a billion years or more. Yaakov Weiss, an Earth scientist at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, and his colleagues crushed portions of South African fibrous diamonds to extract …

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It turns out that Venus (almost) has tectonic plates

Beneath Venus’s acidic clouds and crushing atmospheric pressure lies a rocky surface strewn with geological mysteries. Sometimes referred to as Earth’s “sister planet” because it is similar in size with a similar iron core, molten mantle, and rocky crust, there is evidence that Venus was once a aquatic world like …

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Venus’s cracked surface behaves like sea ice

The Magellan spacecraft captured this radar view of Venus, showing the largest dark red tectonic block in the center, which is roughly the size of Alaska. The lighter colors around the block are warps and ridges. Image via NASA-JPL / Paul Byrne / NCSU. Cracked surface of Venus Venus is …

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The surface of Venus could be shattered into pieces

No other solid body in the solar system has an Earth-like crust. From Mercury to Mars, passing through many moons, most worlds have a one-piece crust. Rather, our planet has tectonics, large plates moving across the molten upper mantle. Another exception to the one-piece surface could be Venus, new evidence …

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The active surface of Venus examined

Credit: NC State University, based on original NASA / JPL images Despite their close similarities in terms of mass and composition, Earth and Venus have evolved differently, at least for the past 0.5 to 1 billion years. On the one hand, an uncontrollable greenhouse effect on Venus produced an average …

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Scientists find signs of geological activity on Venus

There is evidence that parts of Venus’ surface move in the same way as the Earth’s, scientists have said. “We have identified a previously unrecognized tectonic deformation pattern on Venus, which is driven by inner movement just as it is on Earth,” said Paul Byrne, a professor at North Carolina …

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What is plate tectonics? | Tectonic plates

From the deepest ocean trench to the highest mountain, plate tectonics explains the characteristics and movement of the Earth’s surface in the present and the past. Developed from the 1950s to the 1970s, the theory of plate tectonics is the modern update of continental drift, an idea first proposed by …

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Small volcanoes are a big deal on Mars

Life may be at the center of exploration of Mars today, but our planetary neighbor is home to the largest volcanoes in the solar system. Olympus Mons towers 23 kilometers (75,000 feet) above the surrounding landscape, and its neighbors, the Tharsis Montes (Arsia Mons, Pavonis Mons and Ascraeus Mons), stand …

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Planet Earth – WorldAtlas

The Earth is a celestial object and one of the components of the solar system. It is the third planet from the Sun, and the only celestial object capable of supporting life. Earth is the 6th largest object in the solar system, with an average radius of 6,371 kilometers, and …

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Meteorite impacts may have triggered an ancient subduction

Meteorite impacts may have triggered an ancient subduction by Sarah Derouin Thursday February 15th, 2018 The frequent impacts of large meteorites during the Hadean Aeon may have caused temporary episodes of subduction and active plate tectonics on Earth. Credit: Conceptual Imagery Lab at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center. The Earth …

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Meteorites may have created Earth’s first continents

Meteorites may have created Earth’s first continents by Timothy Oleson Wednesday December 23rd, 2015 Earth and Venus were probably much more tectonically similar billions of years ago, when massive impact meteorites could have triggered the creation of an early continental crust, according to a new study. Credit: VL Hansen, Lithosphere, …

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5.1 Quake Rattles Atlantic; No threat of tsunami

The strong earthquake was located near the equator in the Atlantic Ocean. Image: USGS A magnitude 5.1 earthquake struck a few moments ago under the central Atlantic Ocean; fortunately, there is no threat of a tsunami. The strong earthquake took place at an epicenter about 6 miles deep, located at …

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The Deep-time Digital Earth program: data-dri

image: DDE aims to harmonize Earth’s deep-time data based on a knowledge system to study the evolution of Earth, including life, Earth materials, geography and climate. Integrated methods include artificial intelligence (AI), high performance computing (HPC), cloud computing, semantic web, natural language processing, and other methods. seen Following Credit: @Science …

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What subduction teaches about smart design

Photo credit: USGS via Unsplash. My doctoral research focused on the tectonic history of early plates on Earth. Plate tectonics involves the movement of plates on the earth’s surface. It is believed to be driven by subduction, where one plate plunges into the mantle under another plate. Typically, this involves …

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There could be water on all the rocky planets

If you asked someone with reasonable scientific knowledge how the Earth got its water, they would probably tell you that it came from asteroids – or maybe also comets and planetesimals – that crashed into our planet in its infancy. There are details, nuances, and uncertainties surrounding this idea, but …

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