NASA Selects SSAI for Hydrosphere, Biosphere, and Geophysical Support Services Contract

NASA Selects SSAI for Hydrosphere, Biosphere, and Geophysical Support Services Contract

Press release from: Science Systems and Applications, Inc.
Posted: Thursday January 30th 2020

NASA selected Science Systems and Applications, Inc. (SSAI) for the Hydrosphere, Biosphere and Geophysics (HBG) Support Services contract at the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC).

The HBG contract is to acquire scientific research services to design, develop and apply space-based technologies and observations, deployed in the field and in the laboratory to solve problems important to society, including water resources, terrestrial ecosystems and oceans, health, global and regional sea level. climate change, natural hazards, changes in the Earth’s cryosphere, gravity field, magnetic field, solid Earth, topography, reference frames and effects of climate change on life on Earth.

The transition period will begin on or about February 15, 2020 with a contract start date of April 1, 2020 under an IDIQ fee-plus contract (CPFF) with a maximum cap of $425 million.

SSAI will provide a full range of scientific and research support across all of the various laboratories that make up the HBG Subdivision of NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland, including the Cryosphere Sciences, ocean ecology, hydrological sciences, Biosphere Science, Geodesy and Geophysics Laboratories and Terrestrial Information Systems.

SSAI is a leading provider of research and development services in earth and space science, instrument engineering, and information analysis to federal agencies such as NASA and the NOAA.

For more information, contact Adriene Dickerson at 301-867-2000.

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