Lithosphere

Two Houghton students win NASA internship

Micaela Geborkoff and Logan Sandell of Houghton High School have both been selected to be part of NASA’s prestigious STEM Enhancement and Space Science summer internship program. SEES studies the Earth’s atmosphere and its nearest neighboring planets. Normally, students stay at the University of Texas while working at NASA’s Austin …

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Small volcanoes are a big deal on Mars

Life may be at the center of exploration of Mars today, but our planetary neighbor is home to the largest volcanoes in the solar system. Olympus Mons towers 23 kilometers (75,000 feet) above the surrounding landscape, and its neighbors, the Tharsis Montes (Arsia Mons, Pavonis Mons and Ascraeus Mons), stand …

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The African continent is slowly splitting in two

By David STEIN May 6, 2021 at 12:00 p.m. An impressive sinkhole has appeared in southwestern Kenya following heavy rains. Scientists see it as another sign of the gradual break-up of the African continent. The events giving rise to this news took place on the morning of March 19, 2018. …

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Geomojis translates geoscience into any language

The newly created pictograms aim to easily communicate geoscientific and geo-hazardous terms. By Megan Sever Emojis are pictograms used to convey specific messages. They have the same basic meaning in any language: a smile means a smile. What if geoscience fields could create their own pictograms that anyone, anywhere could …

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Meteorite impacts may have triggered an ancient subduction

Meteorite impacts may have triggered an ancient subduction by Sarah Derouin Thursday February 15th, 2018 The frequent impacts of large meteorites during the Hadean Aeon may have caused temporary episodes of subduction and active plate tectonics on Earth. Credit: Conceptual Imagery Lab at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center. The Earth …

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Meteorites may have created Earth’s first continents

Meteorites may have created Earth’s first continents by Timothy Oleson Wednesday December 23rd, 2015 Earth and Venus were probably much more tectonically similar billions of years ago, when massive impact meteorites could have triggered the creation of an early continental crust, according to a new study. Credit: VL Hansen, Lithosphere, …

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